If You’re A Smoker You’re More Likely To Lose Your Teeth

A new study has shown that male smokers are up to 3.6 times more likely to lose their teeth than non-smokers, while female smokers are 2.5 times more likely to eventually lose their teeth.

This research was published in the Journal of Dental Research and was conducted in Germany. Tooth loss that comes with aging is a major worldwide health concern. Thirty percent of 65 to 74 year olds have lost all of their teeth.

Lead author of the study Professor Thomas Dietrich said "Most teeth are lost as a result of either caries (tooth decay) or chronic periodontitis (gum disease). We know that smoking is a strong risk factor for periodontitis, so that may go a long way towards explaining the higher rate of tooth loss in smokers." Interestingly, smoking can mask gum bleeding, which is the main symptom of periodontitis. Therefore, the gums of a smoker can appear to be healthier than they really are.

Smoking also depletes the body of a range of nutrients because they are used up at a higher rate. Cigarettes generate free radical damage in the body and your body then requires more antioxidants to mop them up. Smokers are almost always vitamin C deficient. This is a big problem because vitamin C is required for healthy collagen and healthy gums. You need healthy gums if you want to keep your teeth in place. Vitamin C and selenium are the most important nutrients for smokers to supplement with.

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