Approximately half of people in the U.S. do not get enough magnesium in their daily diets. Chronic suboptimal intake of magnesium increases the risk of a variety of health issues including migraines, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, and type 2 diabetes. People who have Crohn's disease, celiac disease, alcoholism, and type 2 diabetes are at risk for having inadequate magnesium levels. These conditions either impair nutrient absorption, increase magnesium requirements of the body, or deplete mineral stores, resulting in low magnesium levels.

Older people are more likely to suffer from low magnesium levels as well because magnesium absorption decreases with age and our kidneys excrete more of the mineral as we get older. Older adults are also more likely to have medical conditions or take medications that decrease levels of this mineral. Stomach acid-blocking drugs like Nexium can result in significant magnesium deficiency.

Magnesium supplements come in a variety of forms including magnesium glycinate, magnesium orotate, magnesium threonate, magnesium amino acid chelate, magnesium citrate, magnesium chloride, magnesium lactate, magnesium sulfate, magnesium gluconate, and magnesium carbonate. Ask your doctor or pharmacist which type of magnesium supplementation is right for you.